Significant Squall line moving East across the UK!

Parts of the UK will see a short but potentially dangerous spell of weather over the next few hours.

A strong squall line has developed and is currently heading Eastwards across the UK.

As you can see from the picture many cities including  Nottingham, Sheffield, Bradford, Leeds, Newcastle, Hull and others places in the area will see some torrential rain and very strong winds for a short period of time making travelling conditions particularly hazardous.

There is also an isolated risk of the odd rumble of thunder as this strong Squall line passes. 

Flood warnings in place as further Heavy rain and Severe winds are expected!

After two days of Atlantic influenced weather the river levels are already on the rise and the forecast is for further wet and windy spells to come.

Today we had 89MPH recorded in North Wales and numerous areas seeing gusts of over 50MPH.

Tomorrow morning will see the winds continue with gusts up to 70MPH in the South West of England with wind gusts in the range of 50-60MPH elsewhere before the risk transfers to the North West of Scotland from midday onwards.

Beyong this global model predictions are pointing to further spells of strong winds and heavy rainfalls which will only increase the risk of flooding.

The flood warning information service currently has 15 flood alerts and 2 flood warnings in place for England however that number may well increase over the next 7-10 days should the forecasts verify.

STORM Diana to smash Britain with winds of 80MPH! Potential STING JET to amplify winds further!

The relative calm of the last week or so is due to come to an end today as a series of powerful Low pressure systems takes aim at the UK.

By midday Tuesday wind speeds will be on the rise as will the amount of rain fall. Temperatures are also expected to rise up to 15c however given the significant wind speeds it won’t feel that pleasant.

The biggest concern for travellers on Tuesday will be that rainfall which is expected to be heavy at times.

As we go into the period for Wednesday through Friday the winds become the main concern with a chance that the fourth named storm of the season is announced by the UK Met Office (Currently a yellow warning for the period Wednesday to Thursday has been issued).

Update: The IPMA Portuguese weather service have since named this Storm Diana so it will take that name rather than the next on the list of UK Met Office named storms.

An area of Low pressure to the North West of the UK is expected to intensify bringing wind speeds of up to 80MPH across high ground in Northern England and parts of Northern Ireland and Scotland.

An additional risk for parts of England which itself will face strong winds up to 50MPH and Wales up to 60MPH come in the form of a sting jet which could Amplify wind speeds considerably for a short period of time. Should this occur wind speeds could hit 80-90MPH with damage to trees, Fences, Roof tiles etc.

Beyond that the UK is given a brief respite before further wet and windy weather is expected Sunday into Monday.

Severe winds, Flooding and powercuts to cause chaos as stormy conditions are set to hit Britain!

Stormy weather is set to return to the UK tomorrow as a deep area of low pressure currently situated in the Atlantic crosses the UK.

This storm powered by an invigorated jet stream will lead to treacherous conditions for those out and about particularly during Friday evening rush hour.

Maximum wind speeds could hit 70MPH around the West Coasts of England, Wales & Scotland whilst inland areas will see maximum gusts of 50MPH.

Rainfall will also cause problems with as much as 50mm falling.

The Met Office has released the following yellow warning:

Between 13:00 Fri 9th and 23:59 Fri 9th

A spell of heavy rain and strong winds is expected on Friday.

What to expect

A few homes and businesses flooded.

Spray and flooding on roads will make journey times longer.

Some delays to road, rail, air and ferry transport expected.

Delays for high-sided vehicles on exposed routes and bridges.

Some short term loss of power and other services.

Coastal routes, sea fronts and coastal communities affected by spray and/or large waves.

UK expected to be battered by immense storms with 110MPH winds possible on Sunday!

This week is set to go from relatively hot for some of us to wet and extremely windy.

First the UK will feel the effects as EX Hurricane Helene crosses our shores. She will begin to be felt this evening and for much of tomorrow particularly in the West.

As the week goes on we see a succession of strong Low pressure systems flirt with the country.

Generally the worst of these winds will be for Northern Ireland, Northern England and Scotland however on Sunday the current GFS paints a potentially deadly picture.

The most severe storm in some time could hit the UK with extremely strong Hurricane force winds of up to 110MPH!

Currently confidence is low on a mega storm hitting for the end of the weekend but it something we will be monitoring very closely in the coming days.

Millions evacuated as Hurricane Harvey is set to smash into America with 125MPH winds & 3FT of rain!

Hurricane Harvey is set to batter the US with three feet of rain, 125mph winds and 12-foot storm surges.

Harvey continued to intensify  as it steered toward the Texas coast, with forecasters saying early Friday that it had strengthened to a Category 2 storm.

The hurricane with the potential for up to 3 feet of rain, 125 mph winds and 12-foot storm surges could be the fiercest such storm to hit the United States in almost a dozen years. Forecasters labeled Harvey a “life-threatening storm” that posed a “grave risk” as millions of people braced for a prolonged battering that could swamp dozens of counties more than 100 miles inland.

Landfall was predicted for late Friday or early Saturday between Port O’Connor and Matagorda Bay, a 30-mile (48-kilometer) stretch of coastline about 70 miles (110 kilometers) northeast of Corpus Christi.

In preparation for the storm, Gov. Greg Abbott on Wednesday declared a state of emergency for 30 counties, including Austin, Harris and Brazoria.

Storm Doris expected to bring 80-90MPH Winds & over a FOOT of snow!

Storm Doris is now just one day away from bringing widespread disruption with exceptionally strong winds and more than a foot of snow to the UK.

Storm Doris’s rapid development is forecast to see its air pressure drop by around 30 milibars in 24 hours, known as “explosive cyclogenesis” or, by some, as a “weather bomb”.

This causes an intense storm. People need to be aware of the strength of the gusts. The strongest of which look like being in central and northern England.

Storm Doris is expected to move on quickly, with the worst of the weather gone by tomorrow evening, although further Atlantic gusts will bring more rain and wind through the weekend and into next week.

The Met Office have today added to yesterdays warning expanding the area expected to see the strongest winds aswell as issuing an Amber warning for snowfall.

“Heavy snow is expected on Thursday. Accumulations of 10 to 15 cm are likely quite widely with 20 to 30 cm falling on hills above 300 metres. This will lead to disruption to transport and perhaps power supplies.”

“Some very strong winds are expected on Thursday in association with storm Doris with gusts of 60-70 mph likely, and 70-80 mph on coasts and hills. Whilst the strongest winds look to be only short-lived, damage to structures, interruptions to power supplies and widespread disruption to travel networks are likely, with a danger of injury from flying debris. Trees are also likely to be damaged or blown over. Heavy rain is also likely through Thursday as well as some snow over high ground as the system clears eastwards. These may prove additional hazards. The warning has been updated to extend the at-risk area southwards.”

 

Destructive Doris about to wreak havoc across the UK as 4th Storm of the season is named!

Storm Doris has been officially named and is going to push in from the west on Thursday, bringing very strong winds, heavy rain as well as some snowfall in the north with Blizzards for the Scottish mountains!

The winter so far has seen very little in the way of proper winter weather with only 3 named storms. However later this week things are about to change with Doris crossing the UK.

The MetOffice has released an Amber warning which reads as follows:

” Some very strong winds are expected throughout Thursday in association with storm ‘Doris’, with a short period where gusts of 70 to 80 mph are possible. Whilst the strongest winds look to be only short-lived, damage to structures, interruptions to power supplies and widespread disruption to travel networks are likely, with a danger of injury from flying debris. Heavy rain is also likely through Thursday as well as some snow over high ground as the system clears eastwards. These may prove additional hazards.”

Mammoth Super-storm to bring Damaging winds on Christmas Day!

A MAMMOTH super-storm will rip through Britain on CHRISTMAS DAY unleashing powerful winds in excess of 70MPH .

A violent weather system currently hurtling across the Atlantic will hit hours before the festive season kicks off.It is likely to be the biggest storm to hit Britain in more than a year and will smash into the west coast during the early hours of December 25.Powerful gales could generate the second named Storm of the season – Barbara – although the Met Office has not confirmed this.

A separate low pressure system will start to stir things up on Christmas Eve after a wet and windy week ahead.The dismal prediction comes as experts warn temperatures will plunge in the next few days with Christmas Day snow almost certain.After weeks of mild weather thermometers will drop to more usual for the time of year with Scotland and northern England most likely to see a festive flurry.

Snow

Unsettled weather will set in towards the middle of the week

Experts say unsettled weather will set in towards the middle of the week with the weekend megastorm shaping up to be the strongest ever to hit Britain over Christmas.The deep low pressure system currently hurtling across the Atlantic will make landfall at around 6am on Christmas morning.It will see air pressure drop more than 24 millibars over 24 hours – a so-called explosive cyclogenesis, or ‘weather bomb’.

Powerful gales could generate the second named hurricane force storm of the season
The storm will gather speed as it tears across the UK through the course of Christmas Day before heading out towards Scandinavia on Boxing Day.Britain is on alert for damaging gales, colossal waves and torrential rain or snow depending on how low temperatures drop.The Met Office said a flurry of snow is likely across high ground in the north on the big day although for most it will be wet and windy.

Forecaster Steven Keates said: “There is the potential for some quite wet and windy weather particularly across the north of Britain as some deep low pressure systems come in from the Atlantic.

“One weather model indeed shows a drop in central pressure of more than 24 mb, an explosive cyclogenesis.

“People will notice a contrast from the recent weather with the risk of gales or severe gales in parts of the country.

“In terms of snow on Christmas Day – we might see some over higher ground in the north, but for most places it is likely to be wet rather than white.”

Storm Angus to smash into the UK with Winds of 80MPH+

Storm Angus is currently knocking on the door for southern most Britain bringing with it the threat of strong winds, Heavy rain and possibly even some snow!

The first of the named storms to come crashing into the UK after what has been a relatively calm autumn will no doubt be a shock to the system for those caught in the worst of the conditions.
The strongest of the winds which has the potential to cause minor damage with roof tiles, Fences and power lines at risk will be for those in the far south and south east of the country.
Elsewhere it will feel breezy and wet with a large amount of rain associated with the system, Whilst for the highest parts of Wales and then later on the Peak district Snow is a possibility for a short time.

See below the UK MetOffice’s take on storm Angus.

“Storm Angus is expected to bring some very strong winds to coastal counties of southeast England for a time on Sunday morning, when gusts of 70-80 mph are possible. Be prepared for disruption to travel services, interruptions to power supplies and some damage to buildings.”

angus

Whilst the Chief Forecasters view was as follows…

"Angus" will move northeast across southern and southeast England during Sunday morning. Southerly then southwesterly gales are likely with storm force winds developing over the English Channel and affecting some coastal districts. Very squally showers are also expected such that isolated gusts of 70-75 mph are also possible further inland in the Amber warning area.