Record breaking temperatures of up to 27c possible for parts of England thanks to Hurricane Ophelia!

We’ve all heard some of the bad news surrounding Ophelia.

However for parts of England she may be a blessing with the Hurricane dragging a lot of very mild air northwards with her spilling into England.

So much warm air that the temperature record could be broken with temps reaching 26/27c by monday afternoon!

So maybe one last BBQ is on the cards after all.

 

 

Mediterranean melts under extreme heatwave affecting the whole region with temps in excess of 40c! Locally 45c+ today!

Wondered where the summer is? Well look no further than Southern Europe where temperatures are so hot even the sea temperature… Yes the sea water temperature is up to an incredible 30 celcius!

Night temps have been breaking records in a number of places too with over 35c seen in recent nights.

And then there is the daytime temperatures which are not just boiling but are widespread across the region from Turkey through the balkans into Italy the South of France and Spain all hitting highs over 40c. locally we may even see over 45c today.

These hot temps over land have triggered some monster thunderstorms in recent days with 100’s of lightning strikes per minute, Mammoth sized hail, Tornado’s and lots and lots of monsoon like rainfall with more similar storms expected!

Watch Extreme Hail storm in Turkey

Forest fires have also been widespread with many evacuations ordered in various places affecting not only locals but tourists also.

And when cooler weather does move in people close to the coast will still be at risk of huge thunderstorms as the extremely high sea temperatures will likely create severe instability in the atmosphere.

So if you wondered where Summer got to there you have it. But remember if your out in the Heatwave be sure to seek shelter from the sun at regular intervals, Sunscreen a plenty and keep hydrated.

The Greatest 24-Hour Snowfalls in the USA

Snow can pile up several feet in a day’s time when conditions are ripe in many U.S. states.
In fact, 48 of 50 states have received more than a foot of snow during a single 24-hour period, according to data from NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). Of those 50 states, 32 of them – mostly in the West, Midwest and Northeast – have had snowfalls of 30 inches or more in 24 hours.

During those extreme situations, snowfall rates are often an inch or more per hour. Thundersnow also sometimes occurs, an indication of unstable air and strong upward motion in the atmosphere, resulting in heavy snow.

States With Greatest 24-Hour Snowfall Records

Colorado leads the pack with the most extreme 24-hour snowfall record in the Lower 48 states.

If you were 6 feet tall and standing outside for 24 hours in Silver Lake, Colorado, April 14-15, 1921, you would’ve been buried by snow from head to toe. That location saw 6.3 feet (75.8 inches) of snow high in the Rockies at an elevation of 10,220 feet.

One location in Alaska, however, takes the crown for all 50 states.

Tucked away in the mountains northeast of Valdez, Alaska, is Mile 47 Camp, which was buried by 78 inches of snow in the 24 hours ending Feb. 9, 1963. Here, winter storms in the Gulf of Alaska send moisture from the Pacific into the mountainous terrain, making it an ideal spot for incredible snowfall totals.

Three other states have had 24-hour snowfalls exceeding 50 inches, and much like the top two locations, mountainous terrain also played a role in squeezing out those extreme totals.

Those states are California (67 inches in the Sierra Nevada), Washington (65 inches in the Cascades) and South Dakota (52 inches in the Black Hills).

Recent 24-Hour Snowfall Records Broken

Five U.S. states have set new 24-hour snowfall records during the past 10 years.

Connecticut is the most recent state to rewrite the record books when a location near Ansonia saw 36 inches Feb. 8-9, 2013. That new benchmark for the state was set during Winter Storm Nemo, which also hammered several other New England states with more than a foot of snow.

About two years earlier, Oklahoma set a new 24-hour snowfall record when 27 inches piled up in Spavinaw Feb. 9-10, 2011.

A single spring blizzard in March 2009 propelled two states to new 24-hour records. Pratt, Kansas, and Follett, Texas, made state history with 30 inches and 25 inches of snow, respectively, in the 24 hours ending March 28, 2009.

The fifth state to set a new record in the last decade is Nebraska, where 27 inches was measured near Dalton in the 24-hours ending Dec. 21, 2006.

2015 turned out to be another record year for climate change

The latest state of the global climate report reveals 2015 was a record-breaking year, following on from 2014, which recorded the previous highest average global surface temperature.

In 2015 – the warmest year on record for the second year in a row – the Earth’s surface reached more than 1°C above pre-industrial levels for the first time since records began and the levels of dominant greenhouse gases again reached new high levels.

Kate Willett – a senior scientist with the Met Office, specialising in climate monitoring – leads the Global Climate chapter of the report published in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (BAMS). She said: “Looking at a range of climate measurements, 2015 was yet another a highly significant year. Not only was 2015 the warmest year on record by a large margin, it was also another year when the levels of dominant greenhouse gases reached new peaks. Measurements from a series of monitored glaciers showed continuing retreat for the 36th consecutive year, and sea levels and ocean heat content were all at their highest levels.”

The most prominent climate feature of 2015 was the development of an strong El Niño event – the development of a warm pool across the east-central Tropical Pacific Ocean – which helped raise global average surface temperatures in 2015 and CO2 levels. One of the most significant impacts of 2015 was the changes to the world’s water, or hydrological cycle brought by the strong El Niño. Kate Willett added: “Drier-than-average conditions were common, with below average soil moisture and groundwater storage contributing to intense and widespread fires across Indonesia. Globally there was a 75% increase in the extent of land experiencing severe drought, bringing hardship to many communities.”

BAMS report 2015

State of the Climate in 2015

The State of the Global Climate report is compiled by more than 460 authors – from 62 countries – including significant contributions from the Met Office, which leads the report’s Global Climate chapter. The report is led by NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information.

Commenting on the report, Thomas R. Karl, L.H.D., Director, NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, said: “This ‘annual physical’ of Earth’s climate system showed us that 2015’s climate was shaped both by long-term change and an El Niño event. When we think about being climate resilient, both of these time scales are important to consider. Last year’s El Niño was a clear reminder of how short-term events can amplify the relative influence and impacts stemming from longer-term global warming trends.”

“The State of the Climate report continues to be critically important as it documents our changing climate. American Meteorological Society (AMS) is proud to work with so many from the science community to make this publication happen,” said Keith Seitter, Executive Director of the AMS.

The State of the Climate in 2015 is the 26th edition in a peer-reviewed series published annually as a special supplement to the BAMS. The journal makes the full report openly available online.