Flood warnings in place as further Heavy rain and Severe winds are expected!

After two days of Atlantic influenced weather the river levels are already on the rise and the forecast is for further wet and windy spells to come.

Today we had 89MPH recorded in North Wales and numerous areas seeing gusts of over 50MPH.

Tomorrow morning will see the winds continue with gusts up to 70MPH in the South West of England with wind gusts in the range of 50-60MPH elsewhere before the risk transfers to the North West of Scotland from midday onwards.

Beyong this global model predictions are pointing to further spells of strong winds and heavy rainfalls which will only increase the risk of flooding.

The flood warning information service currently has 15 flood alerts and 2 flood warnings in place for England however that number may well increase over the next 7-10 days should the forecasts verify.

DEADLY threat as the Heatwave ramps up across the UK!

A threat to life is becoming a real concern as the Heatwave takes a more sinister turn later this week.

The threat will come from numerous aspects of what is becoming the Hottest summer the UK has ever experienced.

The Met Office released an Amber warning yesterday due to the increasing temperatures and advised people not to go out during the midday sun with the risk of heat Exhaustion/stroke being high, Especially for those more vulnerable, The young, Elderly and of course your pets.

The dangers dont end there however, Strengthening southerly winds on Thursday will see an increased risk of larger, Longer lasting wild fires causing chaos for fire crews.

Then comes the third and potentially devastating risk of flash floods.

The North East, The Midlands, East Anglia and the South East are currently the highest risk areas for intense Thunderstorms to break out on Thursday & Friday.

These storms could see large amounts of rainfall in a short space of time. Should these be slow moving the risk of homes and businesses becoming flooded will be high due to the exceptionally dry ground being unable to absorb the water quickly. This threat will be coupled with frequent lightning, Large hail & strong winds, Posing a risk to Homes, Cars and anyone caught outside.

Whilst Thunderstorms could be severe it is worth mentioning at this stage there is still some uncertainty regarding how widespread they will be. Combine that with the likelihood storms will be isolated seeing one will be the exception not the rule.

As we look ahead the forecast shows a continuation of the same theme. Hot Hot, Chance of storms and then some more Hot weather.

 

Houston Dam begins overspilling adding more woe to a city already devastated by flooding!

An already-swollen reservoir west of downtown Houston has begun to crest levees this morning, sending an “uncontrolled release” of Harvey’s floodwaters into neighborhoods, and putting the besieged city into “uncharted territory,” according to an official.

The Addicks Reservoir, located about 19 miles west of downtown, will spill over for the first time in history by daylight Tuesday, threatening immediate surrounding subdivisions.

Jeff Lindner, a meteorologist with the Harris County (Texas) Flood Control District, told Fox News the spillover will cause “serious flooding in immediate areas,” starting as a trickle, then becoming an uncontrolled release of water. Second-story homes also will be at risk, Linder added.

Lindner said this does not mean that downtown Houston will necessarily be greatly impacted, but officials don’t fully know what will happen because they’ve never faced this situation before.

Millions evacuated as Hurricane Harvey is set to smash into America with 125MPH winds & 3FT of rain!

Hurricane Harvey is set to batter the US with three feet of rain, 125mph winds and 12-foot storm surges.

Harvey continued to intensify  as it steered toward the Texas coast, with forecasters saying early Friday that it had strengthened to a Category 2 storm.

The hurricane with the potential for up to 3 feet of rain, 125 mph winds and 12-foot storm surges could be the fiercest such storm to hit the United States in almost a dozen years. Forecasters labeled Harvey a “life-threatening storm” that posed a “grave risk” as millions of people braced for a prolonged battering that could swamp dozens of counties more than 100 miles inland.

Landfall was predicted for late Friday or early Saturday between Port O’Connor and Matagorda Bay, a 30-mile (48-kilometer) stretch of coastline about 70 miles (110 kilometers) northeast of Corpus Christi.

In preparation for the storm, Gov. Greg Abbott on Wednesday declared a state of emergency for 30 counties, including Austin, Harris and Brazoria.

Southern California bracing for Monsoon conditions due to an ‘off the charts’ storm

Something is going to happen in Southern California on Friday that hasn’t happened in at least six years, possibly longer. It’s going to rain a whole, heckuva lot, and that rain is going to be accompanied by a wide range of other hazards.

It’s all part of one of the most intense storms to strike the region since before the state’s epic drought began in 2012, which is likely to bring several inches of rain on average to areas from Santa Barbara southward to San Diego.

Higher rainfall totals, likely into the double digits, will occur in mountainous areas, with heavy snow falling in the higher peaks of Los Angeles and San Diego counties, among others.

This will lead to landslide and mudslide concerns as heavy rain runs off already saturated hillsides, and flash flooding issues even in urban areas. The highest mudslide risks will be across areas that have burn scars from wildfires.

The storm, which combines an unusually intense low pressure area with a firehose of moisture whose hose stretches back for more than 2,000 miles, way out to near Hawaii, will rage throughout the day on Friday and into Saturday in one of the most populated and storm-averse areas of the country.

At its peak, winds are likely to gust greater than 50 miles per hour in the Los Angeles and San Diego metro areas, which will cause extensive air travel delays and down trees and power lines. Some areas could see winds approach or exceed 100 miles per hour, particularly in the higher elevations of San Diego County.

High wind warnings have been issued for higher elevation areas around Los Angeles and all of San Diego County, where officials are bracing for sustained winds of tropical storm force, or 39 miles per hour or greater, along with higher gusts as the storm center nears the coast.

The National Weather Service has issued a dizzying array of watches and warnings to cover all the storm impacts, which can be found on weather.gov.

According to the agency’s predicted rainfall amounts, some spots could see a two-day rainfall total that ranks within the top 10 all-time heaviest two-day rain events, but this is not expected for most spots.

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According to the Weather Service’s San Diego forecast office, a storm of this intensity at such a low latitude in the state is extremely rare, or “off the charts when looking at the past 30-year record,” the agency said in a forecast discussion.