America & Canada forecast a brutally cold winter!

The Farmer’s Almanac have published their outlook on the winter 2018/19 and the snow/cold lovers amongst you will be very happy.

Against the grain of what the NOAA predicted they infact expect a Severe winter with many Cold & snowy periods.

The NOAA expects a typical El Nino weather pattern thus leading to a generally warmer than average winter, however the Farmer’s Almanac have now thrown a completely different scenario into the mix.

COLD WINTER AHEAD!

So just how cold will it be? According to the Farmers Almanac the real teeth-chattering arrives mid-February especially in the following zones:  Northeast/New England, Great Lakes, Ohio Valley, Midwest, and Southeast (yes, even the Southeast will be in the chill zone!).

The Farmers’ Almanac, which bases its amazingly-accurate long-range forecast on a mathematical and astronomical formula developed in 1818, is also predicting above-normal precipitation (lots of snow!) for the Great Lakes states, Midwest, and central and northern New England, with the majority of it falling in January and February.

And the predictions for Canada look like this…

Intense Blizzard conditions bringing 1 to 2 feet of snow to bring New England to a standstill by Monday!

A snowstorm with blizzard conditions will unleash feet of snow and threaten to bring travel to a halt across New England late on Sunday into Monday.

In some areas, this will be the second storm in less than a week to unleash a blizzard and over a foot of snow.

Behind a weak system that returned snow to New England to start the weekend, a second and more potent storm will follow late on Sunday into Monday.

Bliz Feb 11 PM

At this time, the corridor expected to be in the bulls-eye of heaviest snow will be portions of central and eastern Maine, including Bangor and Bar Harbor.

“The storm has the potential to bring 1 to 2 feet (30 to 60 cm) of snow to parts of central and northern New England and parts of the Maritime Provinces of Canada,” AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Alex Sosnowski said.

Locally higher amounts can occur in parts of central and eastern Maine, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.