Will the USA see a bitterly cold winter?

Well for the snow lovers out there the news you have been waiting for is…

Well not good.

NOAA have recently gave their thoughts on the upcoming winter of 2018/19 and with a strong El Nino likely a warmer than average winter is expected.

So what is El Niño?

El Niño and La Niña are opposite phases of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) cycle. In layman’s terms, the ENSO cycle is a scientific study of the temperature fluctuations between atmospheric and ocean temperatures in the central Pacific. Of these two phases, La Niña is considered to be the cold phase of the ENSO cycle, and El Niño is considered to be the warmer phase. While both phases occur seasonally, historically El Niño is more likely.

The NOAA is predicting a 70% chance of an El Niño pattern winter for the Northern Hemisphere.

When it comes to the winter weather forecast for the 2018-2019 season, the NOAA has reported that there is a 70% chance that we will have an El Niño winter season, meaning early predictions call for a warmer than average winter across the United States.

What does this mean for early winter?

Based on the early prediction for an El Niño winter, the NOAA has predicted that the Pacific Northwest and the Northern Rockies will all see below average to equal chances of precipitation from October through December. However, Colorado, parts of Utah, and the Southern Rockies are all expected to see above-average precipitation for the start of the season. New England is expected to see average precipitation throughout the start of the winter.

The NOAA is predicting higher than average precipitation throughout the Rockies and Colorado, with lower than average precipitation in the PNW, and average precipitation across New England.

While precipitation is expected to fluctuate across the country, the El Niño prediction calls for warmer than average temperatures across the entire country from October through December.

Winter Weather Forecast 2018 2019

The NOAA is predicting warmer than average temperatures across the entire country to start the season off.

What does this mean for mid-to-late winter?

As winter progresses into January through March, most resorts across the entire country are forecasted to see continued equal to low precipitation averages. However, parts of Alaska and the Southern Rockies are expected to see higher than average precipitation in the second half of the winter.

The NOAA is predicting that many resort areas across the United States will see either equal or less than average precipitation throughout the second half of the winter season.

When it comes to the temperature, the entire country is expected to see warmer than average temps continuing throughout the second half of the season.

Warmer temperature patterns across much of the United States are expected to continue straight through to March.

Can we trust this early forecast?

While predictions for low precipitation averages and warmer temperatures are undoubtedly startling for all of the powder chasers among us, it’s important to remember that this early forecast is just that, an early forecast. When it comes to on-hill conditions, individual storm cycles and short-term predictions are far more likely to accurately forecast conditions than anything months out.

Long story short? It’s far too early to make any definitive call, and while the early predictions don’t look great, there is really no telling what the season will bring. Make sure to check back in the coming months for both the Farmer’s Almanac and Old Farmer’s Almanac weather forecasts, as we will be updating you on every early season prediction as they become available.

Millions evacuated as Hurricane Harvey is set to smash into America with 125MPH winds & 3FT of rain!

Hurricane Harvey is set to batter the US with three feet of rain, 125mph winds and 12-foot storm surges.

Harvey continued to intensify  as it steered toward the Texas coast, with forecasters saying early Friday that it had strengthened to a Category 2 storm.

The hurricane with the potential for up to 3 feet of rain, 125 mph winds and 12-foot storm surges could be the fiercest such storm to hit the United States in almost a dozen years. Forecasters labeled Harvey a “life-threatening storm” that posed a “grave risk” as millions of people braced for a prolonged battering that could swamp dozens of counties more than 100 miles inland.

Landfall was predicted for late Friday or early Saturday between Port O’Connor and Matagorda Bay, a 30-mile (48-kilometer) stretch of coastline about 70 miles (110 kilometers) northeast of Corpus Christi.

In preparation for the storm, Gov. Greg Abbott on Wednesday declared a state of emergency for 30 counties, including Austin, Harris and Brazoria.

The greatest total eclipse for the United States in 99 years is nearly here!

Nearly 3 Minutes of total darkness doesn’t sound particularly amazing however when it happens in the day its quite a sight.

To watch the day turn to night in the middle of the day, to see stars and planets come out if even for just an instant, seems inexplicable, magical even.

The darkness during the upcoming total solar eclipse Aug. 21 will last for about 2 minutes and 40 seconds along the path of totality.

Everyone in North America, parts of South America, Africa and Europe – including the UK – will see at least a partial solar eclipse, where the moon covers only a part of the sun.

However, 14 states across the United States will experience a total solar eclipse with more than two minutes of darkness descending in the middle of the day over the course of 100 minutes.

More than 12 million Americans live inside the path of totality and more than half of the nation live within 400 miles of it. Millions more are expected to travel to cities along the path to witness the phenomenon.

Image Credit: GreatAmericanEclipse.com

Sadly Brits won’t get a total eclipse like our friends across the pond, but we will be treated to a slight partial eclipse which will still be worth watching.

It will be visible in parts of England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland from around 19:35 on August 21 – but make sure you’re in a spot where there’s no cloud.