Storm Doris expected to bring 80-90MPH Winds & over a FOOT of snow!

Storm Doris is now just one day away from bringing widespread disruption with exceptionally strong winds and more than a foot of snow to the UK.

Storm Doris’s rapid development is forecast to see its air pressure drop by around 30 milibars in 24 hours, known as “explosive cyclogenesis” or, by some, as a “weather bomb”.

This causes an intense storm. People need to be aware of the strength of the gusts. The strongest of which look like being in central and northern England.

Storm Doris is expected to move on quickly, with the worst of the weather gone by tomorrow evening, although further Atlantic gusts will bring more rain and wind through the weekend and into next week.

The Met Office have today added to yesterdays warning expanding the area expected to see the strongest winds aswell as issuing an Amber warning for snowfall.

“Heavy snow is expected on Thursday. Accumulations of 10 to 15 cm are likely quite widely with 20 to 30 cm falling on hills above 300 metres. This will lead to disruption to transport and perhaps power supplies.”

“Some very strong winds are expected on Thursday in association with storm Doris with gusts of 60-70 mph likely, and 70-80 mph on coasts and hills. Whilst the strongest winds look to be only short-lived, damage to structures, interruptions to power supplies and widespread disruption to travel networks are likely, with a danger of injury from flying debris. Trees are also likely to be damaged or blown over. Heavy rain is also likely through Thursday as well as some snow over high ground as the system clears eastwards. These may prove additional hazards. The warning has been updated to extend the at-risk area southwards.”

 

Destructive Doris about to wreak havoc across the UK as 4th Storm of the season is named!

Storm Doris has been officially named and is going to push in from the west on Thursday, bringing very strong winds, heavy rain as well as some snowfall in the north with Blizzards for the Scottish mountains!

The winter so far has seen very little in the way of proper winter weather with only 3 named storms. However later this week things are about to change with Doris crossing the UK.

The MetOffice has released an Amber warning which reads as follows:

” Some very strong winds are expected throughout Thursday in association with storm ‘Doris’, with a short period where gusts of 70 to 80 mph are possible. Whilst the strongest winds look to be only short-lived, damage to structures, interruptions to power supplies and widespread disruption to travel networks are likely, with a danger of injury from flying debris. Heavy rain is also likely through Thursday as well as some snow over high ground as the system clears eastwards. These may prove additional hazards.”

Winter to return to the UK with over half a meter of snow!

Enjoying the milder weather? Well make the most of it.

As we enter the start of next week the mild air is slowly pushed to one side to make way for colder conditions by Wednesday onwards, With those in the north feeling the chill.

The Scottish mountains are first inline for what could see them receive over half a meter of snow in just a few days with huge drifts which will hopefully be a much needed boost to the dreadful skiing season which is currently one of the worst in recent memory.

For those in Engand, Wales & NI the risk is somewhat muted however the risk is there for some to see snowfall between Thursday evening & Friday morning.

The models are still unsure how far south the jet will dive and subsequently how much cold air will be dragged down the country as a whole so we will have a further update on Tuesday if the risk is still there along with further detail for who may see some snow.

Southern California bracing for Monsoon conditions due to an ‘off the charts’ storm

Something is going to happen in Southern California on Friday that hasn’t happened in at least six years, possibly longer. It’s going to rain a whole, heckuva lot, and that rain is going to be accompanied by a wide range of other hazards.

It’s all part of one of the most intense storms to strike the region since before the state’s epic drought began in 2012, which is likely to bring several inches of rain on average to areas from Santa Barbara southward to San Diego.

Higher rainfall totals, likely into the double digits, will occur in mountainous areas, with heavy snow falling in the higher peaks of Los Angeles and San Diego counties, among others.

This will lead to landslide and mudslide concerns as heavy rain runs off already saturated hillsides, and flash flooding issues even in urban areas. The highest mudslide risks will be across areas that have burn scars from wildfires.

The storm, which combines an unusually intense low pressure area with a firehose of moisture whose hose stretches back for more than 2,000 miles, way out to near Hawaii, will rage throughout the day on Friday and into Saturday in one of the most populated and storm-averse areas of the country.

At its peak, winds are likely to gust greater than 50 miles per hour in the Los Angeles and San Diego metro areas, which will cause extensive air travel delays and down trees and power lines. Some areas could see winds approach or exceed 100 miles per hour, particularly in the higher elevations of San Diego County.

High wind warnings have been issued for higher elevation areas around Los Angeles and all of San Diego County, where officials are bracing for sustained winds of tropical storm force, or 39 miles per hour or greater, along with higher gusts as the storm center nears the coast.

The National Weather Service has issued a dizzying array of watches and warnings to cover all the storm impacts, which can be found on weather.gov.

According to the agency’s predicted rainfall amounts, some spots could see a two-day rainfall total that ranks within the top 10 all-time heaviest two-day rain events, but this is not expected for most spots.

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According to the Weather Service’s San Diego forecast office, a storm of this intensity at such a low latitude in the state is extremely rare, or “off the charts when looking at the past 30-year record,” the agency said in a forecast discussion.