Heavy Snow moving into parts of the UK!

A quick update on our post yesterday and another look at the areas at most risk.

We said yesterday about the risk posed by a large area of moisture sweeping off the Atlantic and hitting the cold air currently in situe over large parts of the UK.

This in turn is going to see the first meaningful snowfall that has the potential to cause disruption in some areas through this evening and into tomorrow.

As of the time of writing 1pm GMT the precipitation falling as snow is moving into Western parts of Scotland gradually pushing Eastwards. By around 6pm this Evening parts of Northwest England will also see the first snowflakes begin to fall. By Midnight tonight the areas shown in pink in the image below are at most risk of seeing any accumulating snow although for low ground this may only be temporary during the heaviest spells.

ptype_13midn

The UK Met Office has released an updated warning that reads as follows…

"Rain will turn to snow in places later on Tuesday and into Wednesday morning. This could bring accumulations of 4 to 8 cm across some hilly areas of northern England and Scotland, largely above 200-300 m, with as much as 15 cm possible above 300-400 m. 

Overnight Tuesday night and into Wednesday morning, as snow peters out over Scotland, Pennine areas are expected to receive a covering of snow, largely on vegetated surfaces above 200-300 m. However, there is also the potential for 5-10 cm of snow to settle to low levels over parts of Yorkshire and down into the northeast Midlands, though with a good deal of uncertainty about this. 

Please be aware of the potential for difficult driving conditions in some areas."

The UK set for the first HEAVY snowfall tomorrow night!

Ok so the usual heard it all before etc etc will no doubt take over the comments section, But for those in the areas at risk lets take a look when and potentially how much.

As we head in to tomorrow evening an area of low pressure is set to move across the UK bumping in to all that cold air that has had us all shivering for the past few days.

As it does so we will see rain readily turn to snow for the places that are shown within the band of pink (Snow).

And without wanting to blow our own trumpet the areas shown seem very similar to those that we mentioned were at risk two weeks ago (Ok apart from Northern Ireland).

The UK & US set to face early blast of Wintry weather with HEAVY snowfalls! Posted: October 25th 2016.

So will we see settling snow?

For many within the area highlighted we will only see a temporary covering at best due to very marginal ground temperatures. However the further north you go or higher altitude you have then the potential is there for between 5-10cms with the very highest ground in both England & Scotland seeing in excess of 20cms!

ptype_42

This could be the first of many snowfalls this winter as experts such as the guys at the UK Met Office are predicting there is an increased chance for a colder than average winter.

We wait to see…

The Greatest 24-Hour Snowfalls in the USA

Snow can pile up several feet in a day’s time when conditions are ripe in many U.S. states.
In fact, 48 of 50 states have received more than a foot of snow during a single 24-hour period, according to data from NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). Of those 50 states, 32 of them – mostly in the West, Midwest and Northeast – have had snowfalls of 30 inches or more in 24 hours.

During those extreme situations, snowfall rates are often an inch or more per hour. Thundersnow also sometimes occurs, an indication of unstable air and strong upward motion in the atmosphere, resulting in heavy snow.

States With Greatest 24-Hour Snowfall Records

Colorado leads the pack with the most extreme 24-hour snowfall record in the Lower 48 states.

If you were 6 feet tall and standing outside for 24 hours in Silver Lake, Colorado, April 14-15, 1921, you would’ve been buried by snow from head to toe. That location saw 6.3 feet (75.8 inches) of snow high in the Rockies at an elevation of 10,220 feet.

One location in Alaska, however, takes the crown for all 50 states.

Tucked away in the mountains northeast of Valdez, Alaska, is Mile 47 Camp, which was buried by 78 inches of snow in the 24 hours ending Feb. 9, 1963. Here, winter storms in the Gulf of Alaska send moisture from the Pacific into the mountainous terrain, making it an ideal spot for incredible snowfall totals.

Three other states have had 24-hour snowfalls exceeding 50 inches, and much like the top two locations, mountainous terrain also played a role in squeezing out those extreme totals.

Those states are California (67 inches in the Sierra Nevada), Washington (65 inches in the Cascades) and South Dakota (52 inches in the Black Hills).

Recent 24-Hour Snowfall Records Broken

Five U.S. states have set new 24-hour snowfall records during the past 10 years.

Connecticut is the most recent state to rewrite the record books when a location near Ansonia saw 36 inches Feb. 8-9, 2013. That new benchmark for the state was set during Winter Storm Nemo, which also hammered several other New England states with more than a foot of snow.

About two years earlier, Oklahoma set a new 24-hour snowfall record when 27 inches piled up in Spavinaw Feb. 9-10, 2011.

A single spring blizzard in March 2009 propelled two states to new 24-hour records. Pratt, Kansas, and Follett, Texas, made state history with 30 inches and 25 inches of snow, respectively, in the 24 hours ending March 28, 2009.

The fifth state to set a new record in the last decade is Nebraska, where 27 inches was measured near Dalton in the 24-hours ending Dec. 21, 2006.

We’re about to see a Record breaking supermoon – the biggest in nearly 70 years

If you only see one astronomical event this year, make it the November supermoon, when the Moon will be the closest to Earth it’s been since January 1948.

During the event, which will happen on the eve of November 14, the Moon will appear up to 14 percent bigger and 30 percent brighter than an average full moon. This is the closest the Moon will get to Earth until 25 November 2034, so you really don’t want to miss this one.

So how do you get a supermoon? 

As NASA explains, because the Moon has an elliptical orbit, one side – called the perigee – is about 48,280 km (30,000 miles) closer to Earth than the other side (the apogee).

When the Sun, the Moon, and Earth line up as the Moon orbits Earth, that’s known as syzygy (definitely something you want to keep in your back pocket for your next Scrabble match).

When this Earth-Moon-Sun system occurs with the perigee side of the Moon facing us, and the Moon happens to be on the opposite side of Earth from the Sun, we get what’s called a perigee-syzygy.

That causes the Moon to appear much bigger and brighter in our sky than usual, and it’s referred to as a supermoon – or more technically, a perigee moon.

Supermoons aren’t all that uncommon – we just had one on October 16, and after the November 14 super-supermoon, we’ll have another one on December 14.

But because the November 14 Moon becomes full within about 2 hours of perigee, it’s going to look the biggest it has in nearly seven decades.

“The full moon of November 14 is not only the closest full moon of 2016, but also the closest full moon to date in the 21st century,” says NASA. “The full moon won’t come this close to Earth again until 25 November 2034.”

 

This one, shot in 2014 over Manhattan, is particularly cool:

If you’re planning on viewing the November 14 supermoon, be sure to get somewhere nice and dark, away from the lights of the city, if you can.

You’ll have some awesome opportunities to take pictures with your phone overnight, but if you want to see it at its absolute biggest, it’s expected to reach the peak of its full phase on the morning of November 14 at 8:52am EST (1352 GMT).

For those of youhttp://www.sciencealert.com/we-re-about-to-see-a-record-breaking-supermoon-the-biggest-and-brightest-in-nearly-70-years in Australia, you’ll need to wait until November 15 to see it, and the Moon will hit its full phase at 12:52am AEST.

Full Story: Biggest Supermoon for nearly 70 Years!